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osl
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OC Newbie
13 Jahre dabei !


Hi all,

I have been wondering, since many Intel and AMD motherboards now have 4-pin ATX 12V power connectors presumably for the CPU, if this substitutes the 20-pin ATX power connector 3,3V connections for the CPU.

In other words does the CPU get all its current from the 4-pin ATX 12V power connector (that must then be transformed from 12V to Vcore onboard ?!) or does it still require all its current from the 20-pin ATX power connector 3,3V connections ?  

If so does this imply that the power requirement for the 20-pin ATX power connector 3,3V connections is considerably smaller when using the 4-pin ATX 12V power connector (then 3,3V is only required for AGP and RAM) ?

Regards,
Ole
Denmark

:noidea:

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Moderator
16 Jahre dabei !

Intel Core i5
3500 MHz @ 4000 MHz
40°C mit 1.10 Volt


I thinkt the CPU gets all the current from 12V but it doesn´t matter if its of the 4pin or 20pin - connector

My Board ( eopx 8rda3-i ) got both the 4pin and the 20pin connector.. And it works with only the 20pin connected and with both connected..

And it is no difference..

In your PC you have DC so you cant use the switching - power - supply - technique.

So it would be a difference in heat if you transform +3,3V to VCore or 12V to VCore ..

I think the 12V is used for the VCore and the 3,3V is a standard-supply voltage for e.g. the PCI-Slots or for SDram ect. ect.
And the 5V is used for the Chipset and some other things as the USB-Connectors ect.

Just think of the immense Ampere you would need to supply an 100Watts - Processor.. You would need about 35 Ampere and this is quite much for these Cables in your PC so they would get warm because of the resistance.. With 12V you need less than 10 Amps ..


Work like you don´t need the money    Love like you´ve never been hurt         Dance like nobody´s watching             Sing like nobody´s listening
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osl
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OC Newbie
13 Jahre dabei !


Thanks. Makes sense.
I guess maybe the article where I read about the 3,3V for CPU was wrong or outdated  (http://www.short-media.com/review.php?r=133&p=3)

Regards,
Ole

:thumb:

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Moderator
16 Jahre dabei !

Intel Core i5
3500 MHz @ 4000 MHz
40°C mit 1.10 Volt


i think that this article is simply wrong and telling shit..

My 460W Enermax provides "only" 35 Amps at 3,3V ( which means a maximum of 115 Watts ) and i run an AMD Barton at 2300 Mhz with 1,85 VCore ..

And the 3,3V + 5V can only provice a maximum Power of 200 Watts

So i think it is impossbile to run my machine with the CPU supplied by the 3,3V - Line ..

And my power supply is rather a strong one.. I know some more people running similar PCs with NoName 400W - Power Supplies that have less than 30Amps ..

By the Way, the Fact that my Enermax can provide 15Amps at 12V ( which means more than 150W ) wouldn´t make really Sense if this Line is only used by the HDDs ect.


(( But while I am reading this text I am really wondering how they manage the heat that is produced while you are reducing a DC Voltage..
Nevertheless, the technique I know cant be used, even if they would use the 3,3V ..

So they have to use something that is reducing the heat to a minimum and then it shouldn´t be a difference between 12V and 3,3V ..  ;))


Work like you don´t need the money    Love like you´ve never been hurt         Dance like nobody´s watching             Sing like nobody´s listening
But Live as if you will die today

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